Sumrall Main St.

The city of Sumrall received Main Street designation on Wednesday, Feb. 12 at the town’s City Hall. At the ceremony were, from left, Sumrall Main Street Director Bethy Aycox, Mayor Heath Sumrall, Mississippi Main Street Association Director Thomas McDavid, and Sumrall Main Street Board President Tony Pflaum. (Photo by Buster Wolfe)

Sumrall became the latest town to become a member of Mississippi Main Street, which has been one of the state’s most effective and cost-efficient economic development programs in the past 35 years.

State and local members of the Main Street program were on hand at City Hall to celebrate the Lamar County town’s designated community status on Wednesday, Feb. 12. Mayor Heath Sumrall accepted the plaque for its designation from Mississippi Main Street Association State Coordinator Thomas Gregory.

Mayor Sumrall said the town is working hard to grow, and the Sumrall Main Street program will be involved in that growth.

“In the downtown area, we’ve got a grant to redo the sidewalks and curbs,” he said. “We are trying to pursue getting the power and telephone lines moved and get some decorative lighting. We’ve got some vacant buildings that have been renovated, and we hope some businesses will be moving in soon.”

Working with the older buildings and the empty storefronts will be a benefit when the town partners with the MMSA program, Sumrall said.

”Renovations have been planned by other businesses, but we’ve been kind of waiting to consult with architects and engineers to see what they suggest,” he said. “First of all, the design architects and engineers will be coming in doing a study of the downtown area, looking at all the historic buildings, and making suggestions as to what they would do with the historic and the aesthetic upgrades to the other structures. From what I understand, they will also help us find funding for those buildings by getting funding or some capital investments, some other sources of funding.”

Money for renovations will be important to the town, Sumrall said.

“It’s going to cost a lot to get that work done, some not as much as others,” he stated. “Some of these buildings are old, and it is going to take some money. The older downtowns are disappearing, and we’re trying to preserve this one as much as we can.”

Main Street Program officials say the concept is a quality of life program. The Main Street program demonstrates that if a community maintains a good quality of life, economic development will follow, according to program literature.

MMSA has 54 member communities that includes Designated Main Street Communities, Network Members and Association Members.

Mississippi Main Street Association has been successful in reinvesting more than $5 billion in public/private investment, assisting with the creation of more than 4,000 new businesses and 30,000 new jobs, and more than 2,000 buildings have been improved in the central business districts of towns and cities across the state.

Sumrall became the latest town to become a member of Mississippi Main Street, which has been one of the state’s most effective and cost-efficient economic development programs in the past 35 years. State and local members of the Main Street program were on hand at City Hall to celebrate the Lamar County town’s designated community status on Wednesday, Feb. 12. Mayor Heath Sumrall accepted the plaque for its designation from Mississippi Main Street Association State Coordinator Thomas Gregory.

     Mayor Sumrall said the town is working hard to grow, and the Sumrall Main Street program will be involved in that growth.

     “In the downtown area, we’ve got a grant to redo the sidewalks and curbs,” he said. “We are trying to pursue getting the power and telephone lines moved and get some decorative lighting. We’ve got some vacant buildings that have been renovated, and we hope some businesses will be moving in soon.”
     Working with the older buildings and the empty storefronts will be a benefit when the town partners with the MMSA program, Sumrall said.
     ”Renovations have been planned by other businesses, but we’ve been kind of waiting to consult with architects and engineers to see what they suggest,” he said. “First of all, the design architects and engineers will be coming in doing a study of the downtown area, looking at all the historic buildings, and making suggestions as to what they would do with the historic and aesthetic upgrades to the other structures. From what I understand, they will also help us find funding for those buildings by getting funding or some capital investments, some other sources of funding.”

Money for renovations will be important to the town, Sumrall said.

     “It’s going to cost a lot to get that work done, some not as much as others,” he stated. “Some of these buildings are old, and it is going to take some money. The older downtowns are disappearing, and we’re trying to preserve this one as much as we can.”
     Main Street Program officials say the concept is a quality of life program. The Main Street program demonstrates that if a community maintains a good quality of life, economic development will follow, according to program literature.

     MMSA has 54 member communities that includes Designated Main Street Communities, Network Members and Association Members.

Mississippi Main Street Association has been successful in reinvesting more than $5 billion in public/private investment, assisting with the creation of more than 4,000 new businesses and 30,000 new jobs, and more than 2,000 buildings have been improved in the central business districts of towns and cities across the state.

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